Educational News

6 Ways to Improve Your Child’s Organizational  Skills

Being organized helps children exceed in educational and business pursuits. Children who have strong organizational skills are dedicated, focused, disciplined, and structured. You want your child to be more organized not only because messiness bothers you, but you know the importance of being a structured person. To help you start building your child’s organizational skills, here are a few of our suggestions.

Develop a Routine

Set a schedule for chores, work, homework, and play. Stick with this routine as much as possible; only deviate during a vacation, emergencies, and a major life change. Additionally, show your child your own routine. Show her all your daily, monthly, and weekly chores, including laundry, paying bills, and work events. This helps ingrain ideas about what it means to be a responsible adult. Your child will associate following a strict routine as part of adulthood.

Write out a Schedule

Every Sunday afternoon, sit down with your child to discuss her important events for the week and project deadlines. Write all important events on a digital and physical calendar. This helps you and her remember when special occasions or important activities are coming up.

For major projects, have your child tell you about them the minute she receives a new assignment, even if it’s due in two months. According to Time, you should set milestone dates for this project: Set a 1st draft date, research date, editing date, and final due date.

Set the digital calendar to send a reminder a day or two before every calendar event. Hang the physical one somewhere you would have to look at it daily.

Teach Responsibility

Don’t just lecture your child about responsibility, show her it. Let your child wake herself up every morning for school. Set her alarm every night, but if she doesn’t wake up from it, don’t wake her up. This forces your child to be in charge of prepping for school, and taking on her attendance responsibility. As she matures, give her more adult responsibilities.

Let her help with laundry, grocery shopping, mailing off bills, and emptying the garbage.

Make a Checklist

Teach her how to make a checklist for daily activities. Have her make one every night before bed, and check off all items on the previous night’s list. Get her to read the list every morning before starting her day. This routine will get her more focused on taking on daily challenges.

Designate a Study Time and Room

Pick a quiet place in the house for doing homework. Remove all distracting items, like toys, smartphones, tablets, and television. Pick a block of time every day to begin and end homework time. Base the homework time on daily schedule and level of intensity of daily lesson.

Buy Organization Tools

Print out some Office Depot coupons, and then stock up on necessary organization supplies. Your list should at least include:

  1. Notebook with dividers and subject headers
  2. Binders and folders
  3. Planner
  4. Mini-whiteboard
  5. Different color pens
  6. Labels
  7. Markers and highlighters

Make sure that you buy some unique, creative organization supplies to get your child even more enthusiastic about being organized.

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